The Oak Woodlands & Forests Fire Consortium is an exchange for fire science information. Funded by the Joint Fire Science Program, our goal is to increase the availability and consideration of credible fire science information to those making land management decisions.

What We do

  • Identify end-user information needs
  • Facilitate two-way communication between fire scientists and managers
  • Organize activities related to fire science

The Region

The geographic region of the OWFFC covers nearly 1 million hectares and 11 states. The region encompasses the Cross Timbers and southern tallgrass prairie, Ouachita Mountains, Ozark Highlands, and the Interior Low Plateau ecoregions. The region contains a diverse representation of federal public lands including: 5 national forests, 11 national park service units, 11 wildlife refuges, Native American administered lands, and numerous Department of Defense managed lands. The region is bordered by the tallgrass prairie to the north, the Appalachian Mountains to the east, the Mississippi alluvial plain and the Upper West Gulf Coastal plain to the south, and the mixed-grass prairie to the west.

The OWFFC region is united by the historical dominance of oaks and fire was an important disturbance affecting vegetation development and the corresponding wildlife habitat. Oaks remain an important component of this region, both ecologically and economically, but fire has been largely lost due to suppression, land use changes, agriculture, and urbanization. Today, fire use and acceptance varies widely. Fire research is conducted by scientists at federal and state agencies and universities.

Our Team

Consortium Staff

Joe Marschall
Consortium Coordinator | Email

Michael Stambaugh
Consortium Chair & Lead PI | Email

Governing Board

Keith Grabner, U.S. Geological Survey
Rich Guyette, Univ. Missouri
Dan Dey, U.S. Forest Service
Craig Harper, Univ. of Tennessee
John Weir, Oklahoma State Univ.
Jeff Sparks, Texas Parks and Wildlife
Charles Ruffner, Southern Illinois Univ.
Todd Hutchinson, U.S. Forest Service
Chris Thornton, U.S. Forest Service

Advisory Board

McRee Anderson, The Nature Conservancy; Arkansas
Mike Black, Shortleaf Pine Initiative; Tennessee
Forrest Blackbear, Bureau of Indian Affairs; Tribal Lands
Joe Robb, U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service; Indiana
Ben Webster, Missouri Department of Conservation; Missouri
Scott Crist, U.S. Forest Service; Illinois
Rich Gray, Texas A&M Forest Service; Texas
Andy Radomski, U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service; Kentucky